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the 17 you're yo zone nations have agreed to give an additional loan of nearly $45 billion to greece. they say the debt reduction plan is on its way. the loan will be granted as early as next week. at a meeting last month, the euro zone nation ministers agreed in principle on aid for greece after the government carried out austerity and other measures as preconditions for additional loans. at that time they suspended the final decision on loans. they said they needed to determine if greece's bond buy-back program would be effective. at thursday's meeting they endorsed the buy back plan of the depreciated bonds. they will repurchase bonds from the private sector at a third of their face value. the ministers agreed on a separate loan of nearly $20 billion for greece by thend of next march. loans to greece were suspended for the past six months. >> today's decision on the greek package will remove the clouds that are hanging over greece. >> and the greek prime minister welcomed the decision calling it a big success for greece and a big success for europe. investors are still uncertain a
, you know, yo-yo ma and all the people in dance and music and creative people are-- . >> rose: are what? >> wonderful, they're great to be with. you know that. >> rose: so what's on your agenda now. >> my son michael and i who is one of the wletions of my life is that michael is an excellent writer, director and producer. work together in the kennedy center honors. you can be-- you can be sure that his contribution to the led zeppelin segment outdistance mine. >> rose: if he wrote that, you tell him he has my highest respect because i thought it was brilliantly written. >> sdechlt and he conceived that ending with stairway to heaven. and robert plant told me that they were loving this tribute, but we were kind of dreading. we know stairway to heaven is coming because he has seen it done so badly. and this eatmt wh the choir and strings, they really loved it. but we're making it a feature length documentary about her block. >> rose: oh yes, are you doing that now. >> the great cartoonist for "the washington post". >> five time pulitzer prize winner. and one of the really great journalist
. >> susie: now that you bring up the economy, let's look at exactly what the results are, when k yo wh the outlook for the global economic growth would be, 40% felt that the global economy would expand, 20% felt that there might be contraction. and europe continues to struggle in 2013. can you tell us a little bit more, give us more color on those results? >> sure. there is more ownership about-- optimism than economic growth than last year. but there are concerns. the european debt crisis is the largest one and also very intereingly dspite th fact tha stck maet leels ve rover broadly speaking to prefinancial crisis levels, our members are very concerned about the crisis of confidence driven by ethical issues in the finance industry itself. and that is something that we pay great deal of attention to. is restoring confidence through better ethics in the profession. >> all right. we're sgoing have to leave it there. very interesting survey and the results. thank you so much. john rogers, c.e.o. of the cfa institute. >> tom: in the world of financial markets, what's bad for the economy c
. johnson and johnson on the new yo sto exchange also on your buy list. tell us what attracts to you this one. david, you gave us the name of a little known company that is on your list, tell us what it does and wh you picked this one. any disclosures, david, do you own these stocks? all right, thanks so much, have a great holiday. we'll see you soon next time. david pelletier, portfolio manager at the slow rog in 2012 slow progress in 2012 of women moving into top positions, in boardrooms and the executive suite. new research from catalyst shows 16.6% of fortune 500 company directors are women, up from 16.1% last year. 14.3% of company executive officers are women, up from 14.1% a year ago. as for c.e.o.'s, the number of women on the fortune 500 will hit a record 21 on january 1, when phebe novakovic takes charge at general dynamics. recently i talked with catalyst president ilene lang and asked her what's holding women back. >> the reason women don't get to the top jobs is because in their careers they are not tapped for the assignments that would really give them that
. tha yo >> joe davis, chief economist at ativan guard group >> susie: still ahead, the top tech trends for 2013, or how your cell phone will become an even bigger part of your life in the new year. >> susie: a lot of mixed messages for investors today. joining us now to sort through it all, ann miletti, senior portfolio manager at wells fargo advantage funds. >> so, anne, what do you think you heard, the economist talking about a mild recession. are we in for a correction in the ock market if that happens? >> i think right now the market is trying to predict how long this uncertainty is going to last. so right now, you know, because the market is a measuring tool, it's measuring how long the uncertainty with the fiscal cliff will last. if it's short and we get a resolution, i think we will avoid a recession. if it takes months to figure out, then i think in a slow-growth economy we could get into recession territory pretty easily without some certainty. >> but as you know, we're going to be -- even if we get a deal, we will be hearing reports on quarterly earnings in the next couple of
's your fault. >> rose: it's your fault if yo don'tet it. >> for several reasons. because are you not good enough. are you not loved. we are not liked. they don't trust you. you don't have the right technique. you don't have the right charisma. there are many-- . >> rose: charisma is important. >> yeah, but in the moment you think you have car is marks you are finished. >> rose: you either have it or you don't. it's not whether you think you have it but you think -- >> yeah. >> there are people who write about you and say that you are vry authoritarian. >> si. this is not true. i say that there is no one orchestra that doesn't like me. i mean not musically, as a person because-- . >> rose: that's to the about as a person. it's about the conductor of an organize tra and music director. >> not authoritarian. one time, when i was music director of the london fill harmon ya, the manager one day came to me and said maestro, you kow sometime the players a a little bit-- when you-- they ask a question and you answer no. they take this answer a little bit with some difficulty. i said why. >> becau
by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to yo pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh
start. if you still need to reform the tax code, yo still needo do something to make social security sustainably solvent. >> ifill: but there were several sticking points to your approach. one of them was raising the retirement age to 69. if that was back on the table could you imagine that breaking through the current political environment. >> i think basically now, gwen, there are three sticking points. one is the amount of revenue and the sources of revenue. the second is the amount of spending cuts and how much of that will come from the entitlement programs particularly health. the last sticking point is what do we do aut this debt lit that we've come up against all the time that puts our credit in danger. >> ifill: the president has said the debt limit should be, at least in his opening statement, that the debt limit debate should be set aside and that nothing can be done unless the taxes are cut... are raised for the wealthy. is that part of a solution that you can see working for what it is everybody is trying to get to here? >> look, gwen, i'm not a bit worried that it appea
in a position where you could make something happen, what would be -- and i want to ask all of yo this question -- wha are the first ings tat need to happen at&t this point when the country is focused on what happened last week in connecticut? >> i think there are two very important areas of change. one is policy. i think we need to have the conversation about these military-style weapons and very importantly about background checks. but i also think the other part ties with your other guest's comments about the memental health system and actually awareness in education. yeah, you know, president obama very compelling said la night, "we're never going to prevent everne of these tragedies from happening, but that's not an excuse for inaction." background checks wouldn't have prevented last night. you know what might have? education about the danger of bringing guns into the home where you have a child that is a danger to either themselves or others. i'd love to see the clinical community get involved >> woodruff: i'm going to interrupt you because i need to give everybody a chance to say somethi
that it went directly to their bottom line, you see? d then they started, then yo have the, yves probably knows more about this than i do, these compensation committees that the corporate executives hire to design their compensation. and they all tell the boards, "oh, you have to pay this guy 500 times what the average worker's being paid or he might leave. and that we can't allow that possibility." >> oh, it's marvelous, yes. no company wants to have their ceo be in the top -- in the bottom 50% of whatever the consultant defines the relevant universe as. so you create this perpetually ratcheting system, right? because the consultant will do the study that somehow finds that their ceo's in the bottom half. so his pay gets moved up, which moves the average up. and bumps somebody else into the bottom half. and then oh my god, his pay has to be moved up. so independent of corporate profits increasing, just the mechanism of the way they do these studies, keeps everybody leapfrogging -- >> of course, we've had a oblem with the corporate boards that berle and means, you know, identified back in the 1
. >> suarez: laura juddkiss of the "washington post" thanks for joining us. >> thank you. ifill: yo >> ifill: you can look more closely at that great photo on our web site, where there's also a link to "pbs parents," where you can find more of mister rogers' videos. >> woodruff: amazing photo. again, the major developments of the day. there were offers and counter- offers on the table, but no deal in the talks to resolve the nation's fiscal crisis. newtown, connecticut, held more funerals for victims of friday's school shootings. and amid talk of new gun legislation, the national rifle association said it would offer "meaningful contributions" to prevent new massacres. online, we ask, what are the three best ways to land a job? kwame holman has the details. >> holman: getting a foot in the door of your dream job is a job in itself. our resident headhunter can guide you through the process. find his advice and ask him your questions on the business desk. all that and more is on our web site, >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i
that done for the people. >> ifill: guess what i'm asking finally is why-- h do yo know thre won't be backlash to this sort of new control? >> there is also alzheimer's going to be some that don't favor a reform, don't favor any kind of step forward in public safety, and they maybe make, in my opinion, specious arguments against that. i think the overwhelming majority of american citizen, after what we saw last friday, and i think all of us saw in america the good people coming together to say, "enough is enough. it's time that we take action, that we be heard, not just an interest group, but ratherthe common good represented by the greatajory ofamericans. we've done this before in our country's history. we've changed laws that were needed to be changed, and it's high time to do it now. >> ifill: governor pat quinn of illinois, thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >> woodruff: now, ray suarez takes a closer look at the potential powers and limitations on what the president and individual states can do. >> suarez: and for that, we get two views from people who have written extensi
and the prime minister arguing with each other that would be the best. >> se: yo are part of t decision making process there for all the reasons we said. syria. >> well, deeply depressing. the assad regime -- l go. >> rose: how will it go? >> well, i think there are some encouraging signs it's so depressing and bloody and people are losing their lives but it seems to me that the opposition forces are making some ground. they're more unified than before. you can officially recognize as the future government of syria. i think that's encouraging but encouraging against the backdrop of a lot of people losing their lives. >> and libya? >> well, libya, obviously there was the awful attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi and the death of a very brave american ambassador. you know that points to, of course, serious problems but it's again the backdrop n which it's been quite a success story since the war there. you do have a functioning government. auto revenues have come back and that's important because they can provide revenues for their general population. there's obvious a serious security prob
and execution. you need to have that quality product. and yo ne to have people will execute it. so it's trying to bring those two together, that strong team that has a common vision, a common goal and building relationships with the suppliers. that's so, so important. make sure you have relationships and you're supporting the suppliers so that they can continue to do what they do. people like diane sinclaire who does our butter in vermont. >> rose: your what in vermont? >> our butter. she has seven cows and she supplies with us butter and making sure we support her. keith martin who's in pennsylvania. he's our lamber. people likthisre so, so important to what we do and the quality of what we do and without them chefs would be hard pressed to have the stature they have now. i hope the whole farm to table, farm to plate is happening now, working closely with parmers. in many cases, like french laundry, we have our own garden. we have almost three acres planted today so we're producing our own food as well. >> rose: fresh laundry will always have the deepest place in your start >> always. it's a
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)